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Culinary Ask a Chef: Or Zombie explains Cooking

Discussion in 'The Burrow' started by Zombie, Aug 25, 2017.

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  1. why?

    why? DA Member

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    That's really insightful, thanks. I like reading your cooking tips. Also, I'm real glad you made me/us discover Mario Batali. He's so in love with his food, it's amazing. I love it. He seems like such a sweet guy too.

    What differently would I have to do with lamb? I have some rump sitting in the fridge at the moment. At least, I think it's rump. I'm not very much in the know about these things. Mother got it from the shop, and I didn't go with. So, I googled a bit, and judging from the pictures I saw, that's what I have. :$

    Last time, I just put it on a bed of onions, some sliced garlic and threw it in the oven with a bunch of butter. I liked it, but I wanted to try something different?

    On another note, how can you tell if a piece of meat* (including gamier stuff, like duck - there's a Batali recipe with lentils and bacon that I'm dying to try) is safe to eat a bit bloody? Over here people eat meat well done usually (gasp) and I only ever ate my steaks bloody when I lived in Europe. I've been brainwashed about this for years, so I'm a bit scared. Oh and the lamb is usually imported all the way from effing New Zealand, so I have no idea how "fresh" it is, even if it's sold in the refrigerator section of the shop, and not frozen.

    *and fish too. I get really scared of eating medium rare tuna here (for e.g), because the fishmongers just have them out in the open and there's fucking flies on them all the time. I haven't the slightest clue how safe that would be?
     
  2. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Yeah it kinda sucks because he’s getting hit with all the sexual misconduct shit going around right now. He’s had to step away from his business and he’s left his other entertainment commitments. I don’t’ know the veracity of the claims, but I’ve followed him since I was a young child.

    In regards to the recipe, I can give you a different recipe with lamb if you want to try that. I’m typing quickly from my mobile so may not covert to metric. Sorry to be so barbaric.


    185ml (3/4 cup) thick teriyaki sauce
    1 garlic clove, crushed
    1 tablespoon honey
    1 tablespoon chopped cooking ginger
    1 teaspoon soy sauce
    2 fillets (about 200g each) lamb eye of loin (backstraps),
    2 tablespoons caster sugar
    1 tablespoon white vinegar
    1 Lebanese cucumber
    1/2 small red bell pepper(capsicum for some people), deseeded, thinly sliced lengthways
    215g (1 cup) rice
    15g sesame seeds


    Place the teriyaki, garlic, honey, ginger and soy into a shallow dish; place your lamb in whole. You can do chunks at this point but with lamb you’re wanting done on the outside and about medium on the inside. Lamb has bacteria on the outside, but nothing internally. If you do chunks now, the lamb may be overdone in the end.

    Cover, and refrigerate for about 30 minutes. In general, 30 minutes while in a cool environ is the minimum amount of time to impart flavor. You could marinate for longer, it just depends on how strongly you want your marinade to be represented in the end.

    Your veg is going to be some quick pickles. You can skip this if you want, but take the cucumber, run your peeler down it and make long ribbons. Or you can do slices if you want.. Put some sugar and vinegar in a bowl, and whisk the sugar until it’s dissolved. Add in your ribbons and make sure they’re coated well. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

    Cook you some rice, and then toast your sesame seeds on the side, maybe thirty to forty seconds. When they’re golden, throw them into rice and mix.

    In a pan, put your drained lamb in and cook for 3 to 4 minutes on each side, when you turn it, take some of your marinade and add it to the pan. This will make a sauce because it will reduce down. Tasty.

    Your lamb will be browned and safe to eat on the outside, and at a medium temp. This will be a slight pink in color. You’re looking for an internal temp of 62.7 C.

    This is a modification of the earlier recipe, but same principles.

    That’s not a bad way. Next time you have a roast, butterfly it (this means cut it down the center but not all the way through, and then kind of roll it out. Think of it like a meat fruit roll.) Take those bedding you cooked it in, add some rosemary, and layer inside the meat. Roll it up like a pinwheel. Tie it with some butchers twine and cook. Serve with some asparagus and whatever white wine you enjoy drinking. If drinking is your thing.

    Bacon is a texture thing in the end, so145 I’ll address that recipe specifically. If you’re cooking from like a slab, and its whole cut bacon. You’re going to cook it lardon style. That’s chunks of bacon that you’ll cook down until they’re about half their original size. The bits of meat will be dark, and will be slightly crispy. This is something that you want to gauge by eye. It’s a bit harder to temp bacon when you cook it in chunks, just make sure that its not black, but kind of shiny and still has some give to it if you pick a piece of up and bend it. Some people are savages and like their sliced bacon to be like charcoal. Thats not tasty.

    Here’s where I’ll reference my other post, again, that I made in the food safety thread. https://forums.darklordpotter.net/posts/1017328/ I cover most meat temps. If you’re not sure on, or not familiar with a piece of meat, go by the food temp chart.

    Generally, and if people are lazy, I’ll cover it here as well, these are some temp zones to hit, you’re looking for 5 minutes max at these temps to ensure that all surface and internal bacteria have been killed. On most whole anything, you’ve only gotta worry about surface bacteria. Not much internally, unless your seller has unsanitary practices. SO, disclaimer, only buy meat from those you trust. If you feel they’re suspect, then they probably are.

    Turkey, Duck and Goose, should be 73.8 C internally when done. Fish and shellfish should be 62.7C. Rabbit you’re looking for 71 C. Venison steak, roast and such should be 62.7C internally, and ground should be 71 C.

    If it’s an open air market, you’re going to see flies. With fish, I’d say pick out a whole one and have them dress it in front of you. It’s easier to ensure that the fish steaks you’re buying are from a single source and not from multiple fish, or that they’re old product. Make sure that the eyes are not cloudy and that if they have a strong fishy smell, then it’s probably bad. Strong fish smell here means borderline rancid. You will know what fresh fish and rotten fish smells like, if not ask your monger to smell his guts barrel. Then you will know. A few flies aren’t bad and any contamination they may bring will be cooked off. If it looks like an Egyptian plague, then you may have bigger issues.

    Meats about personal preference when it comes to being done, myself, I eat everything raw, or rare. In the case of beef, I eat it rare/raw. Fish, most cuts I eat raw. But I have a trusted source. I eat some cooked fish, but it’s usually steamed or acid cooked. Game meat like venison, I don’t’ really eat that much out of season. In season, I’ll have it about three or four times. And its usually medium. I stick to my cooking temps religiously. Personally, I fucking hate Turkey. I don’t like Goose, and I eat duck only on rare occasions. I’ve never been one to eat a duck breast. It doesn’t appeal to me. I do like me some crispy duck with the skin on though.
     
  3. Halt

    Halt 1/3 of the Note Bros.

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    Just bought some nice burger patties from a quality meat store but have no idea how to cook them. Any tips?
     
  4. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Well, when you're ready to cook them. Make sure they're chilled. It will help them keep their shape better. If you have cast iron, I'd suggest you use that, but if you don't, use a skillet without the teflon coating because you're looking for char. Sprinkle a bit of salt and pepper onto them, and then pat that into the meat.

    Place no more than two at a time, if you plan to eat more than one into a pan with some melted butter. Make sure that its low-sodium butter. Cause you're not wanting to turn your mouth into a desert. Cook on one side for about five minutes. Shake the pan slightly to break the burger loose from the pan about 2 minutes into cooking. That lets the butter get under the meat and helps it brown up.

    At five minutes, on med-high heat, tilt your pan slightly so that the butter is on one side, take a spoon and baste the top of the patty, before turning over, and repeating those steps.

    Cook for another five minutes, the interior should be just off pink.

    Take your bun, put it burger side down on a pan, with a bit of butter spread onto it, and let it cook until brown. This will keep it from getting soggy, but keep your exterior bit of bun tender to the tooth.

    Maybe saute some onions until brown, and add those on top with a dollop of your favorite steak sauce. You want something vinegar based to cut through the fat of the meat.

    Depending on the leanness of the patties, 80/20, 85/15, 93/7 you want to regulate how you cook with your heat. Most burgers are 80/20. This helps the patties stay together on the pan when you cook them. If you have lean meat, then you usually want to add some filler into it, like egg to help bind the meat together.

    Toppings can be as follows:
    Mustard, Mayo.

    Lettuce, Onion.

    Or just a slice of tomato if that's your thing.


    Spice it up a bit, fry an egg up, sunny side. So that the yellow runs just a little when you bite into your burger.

    Or, you can take your favorite steak sauce from above, add a bit of water to it to thin it out, and paint it onto the burger to help it build a crust of sweet/savory/spicy deliciousness.
     
  5. Rah

    Rah Auror

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    Yo @Zombie, need some advice.

    I was watching a new episode of Binging with Babish where he stuck some skewers in the base of a pineapple, stacked pork on it and topped it off with the tip of the pineapple to make a makeshift shawarma. Then put it in the over and turn it every few minutes.

    I'm gonna try it with Chicken tomorrow but need to marinate it overnight. What's a solid marinade I should try? I was going to just fuck around and throw in some Olive oil, lemon juice, paprika, cayenne, cumin, garlic powder, some hot sauce, and maybe sumak if I can find any. Anything else that would work well? Maybe I'll do two batches with different marinades.

    Also wouldn't I have to shave off the first layer of meat and put it back in to make sure it's all cooked in the middle or should I just crisp the outside layer and let the oven take care of the middle of the stack?

    Thanks!
     
  6. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Edit: @Rah Thanks, I watched the video but I guess I missed that bit.

    My suggestion for cooking chicken that way would be to do a low and slow so the outside doesn't get as done as the inside.

    So you can approach this a couple ways.

    1) Wrap in Tin-foil, cook on regular temp, and based on how many pounds of chicken you got, its 30 minutes per pound at 375F. Towards the end, remove the tinfoil, crank the heat and that marinade you have, I'd keep some in reserve, baste on the outside so you can get that crispy crusty exterior while having a cooked interior. Do this for about 10 to 15 more minutes to ensure even browning. If you have a convection oven, dial your temps down by about 20, but go for the same amount of time.

    If you have the elements in the top and bottom, hopefully they alternate, but some that I've used in the past, unless you're broiling you can't turn the top element on unless you broil, and its at about 5000 degrees hotter than you need it to be. So if this is the case, set your oven rack second from the bottom and alternate between the two elements.


    2) use the shred method he showed previous to that. Glass dish, herbs and spices, and fruit. Cook it up, and shred afterwards. This ensures even cooking and a even distribution of your marinade. If you're wanting some crispy bits you can again broil the top and mix it up after wards.


    Marinades you can do something like, depending on your spice tolerance. Honey Sriracha (even though I personally hate it, mixed with honey isn't that bad)

    You can take some more traditional flavors like Lemon Pepper, or traditional rotisserie flavor. Good mix up I have for that is as follows:

    • 2 tbs kosher salt
    • 2 tbs of smoked paprika
    • 3 tsp onion powder
    • 1½ tsp garlic powder
    • 3 tsp thyme
    • 1½ tsp black pepper
    • 3 tsp white pepper
    • 1½ tsp cayenne pepper
    • 1 tsp crushed dry rosemary
    You can sub rosemary for tarragon. If you can get it fresh, preferably that. But the dried kind of helps with the rub down tbh.

    Lemon Pepper would be good too. Just depends on the flavor profile you're looking for. I'd say a more traditional approach would work better because it doesn't affect your cook times as much. Thing about using super wet marinades is that it increases your cook time.

    With chicken you want to make sure that you've got a good internal temperature. As long as you get that, you're fine.


    That pineapple trick was pretty neat. I found the video he referenced as a video rec on youtube. I hadn't considered it before, but I don't usually do shawarma.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2018
    Rah
  7. Johnnyseattle

    Johnnyseattle Auror DLP Supporter

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    I saw this as well, and basically had the same thoughts. I'm actually going to try this over the weekend if my girls say it sounds good, and I think what I'll end up doing is cooking it at a pretty low temp for a while at first - say, 225 or so, until it registers about 140ish in the middle. At that point, you could jack the heat up quite a bit and brown what you want to on the outside as needed.

    Also, a part of me went all Alton Brown, and wondered if you could set up a small pan or baking sheet, so when you put the pineapple close to the side of the oven, the pan could be at the same distance on the other side, and it would kind of work as a reflector(or conductor, maybe?) and brown on both sides. I'll have a fire extinguisher handy just in case.

    As for the marinade, I've done a full pork shoulder marinated in al pastor stuff, and it was dreamy. I kind of used part of the Serious Eats marinade for it, and it turned out about as well as one could hope for. It would probably do fine here.
     
    Rah
  8. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Which video mang.

    So I can see it in action.
     
  9. Rah

    Rah Auror

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    About 11 minutes in.

    Edit:

    Ended up using Cumin, Paprika, Smoked paprika, Coriander, Cayenne, Garlic salt, Sumak, pink Salt, crushed Aleppo pepper, and a little cinnamon plus olive oil, lemon juice, and some franks red hot as an overnight marinade. I'll let you know how it turns out when I make it tomorrow!
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2018
  10. Krogan

    Krogan Alien in a Hat Prestige DLP Supporter

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    So, I’ve got a new one from me for you Zombro. A random idea I had actually came out magnificently tonight when I made deep fried whiskey chilli balls. Now I really want to try making deep fried pickles which I’ve always loved but I want to make the pickles too. Any tips, tricks, suggestions? I’ve never done this before so I only know the theory.
     
  11. Rah

    Rah Auror

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    I'm not sure how these would taste deep fried but I'm going to try out this method soon! I love pickles so making them seems like it'll be fun.
     
  12. CareOtters

    CareOtters Headmaster DLP Supporter

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    I'm trying to build a habit of meal-prepping for breakfasts and lunches. Got any advice, suggestions, or recipes to share?
     
  13. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Sorry, I didn't see your post until now.

    I think I helped someone with this same thing earlier in the thread, so maybe look at those recipes.
    Basically the weakness and strength of meal prepping is cooking a lot of the same thing, and then being able to consume the same thing every day.

    I would think about what you like to eat, and what you think you can eat on a daily basis.

    You want to pick a day out of the week that you have free time, most people that meal prep that I know do it Sunday evening for the week before. You don't want to have to do it in the middle of the week when you're going to be busy.
    So, @CareOtters to better give you ideas for recipes, is there anything that you like more than something else, and that you wouldn't mind eating 6 days a week?

    Let me know that and I might be able to assist you better.
     
  14. CareOtters

    CareOtters Headmaster DLP Supporter

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    Well I'm trying to use more local seasonal veg, so ideas based around cabbage, cauliflower, parsnips, etc would be perfect if you have some.
     
  15. Joe

    Joe The Reminiscent Exile Prestige DLP Supporter

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    My mother always used to chop a few carrots, parsnips, and something like brussel sprouts and soften them in a frying pan, before adding butter, softening s'more, then adding a good tablespoon or three of runny honey. Let the vegetables get a little caramelised/burnt - it tastes great.
     
  16. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    I'll just answer this with a link I found that was pretty neat, it's a meat/cabbage, and its prep quantities. I can bulk meals for number of people dining in pretty easy, but when it comes to meal preping I just hunt recipes that can scale easily. This will maybe suit you. Hopefully you're not vegetarian.
     
  17. Moukaboy

    Moukaboy Fifth Year

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    @Zombie Hey what's cassonade and is it similar enough to brown sugar than I can use it in cookies ?

    Edit:
    Cassonade is a french word btw , don't know what its direct translation would be.
    Edit2:
    Also vanilla extract, the nearest store that sells it is about an hour drive , any good substitutes ?
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2018
  18. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

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    Cassonade is brown sugar. Yes you can use it in cookies. They're going to be dark and have a strong molasses flavor. If you've ever had sorghum then that's pretty good in a cookie.

    You could sub vanilla with pancake syrup or maple syrup. Which ever is easier.
     
  19. Johnnyseattle

    Johnnyseattle Auror DLP Supporter

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    Hey, I didn't see this until today, but this is one of my favorite Seriouseats articles, and it's about chocolate chip cookies, and there's a part about the difference between brown and white sugar that may interest you.
     
  20. Moukaboy

    Moukaboy Fifth Year

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    That was an intéresting article, gonna have to try some of these methods myself, not sure if I'll give thé recipe a go though.
    A little too complex and ,more importantly, time consuming.
     
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