RL Questions that don't deserve their own thread

Discussion in 'Real Life Discussion' started by Ched, May 31, 2013.

  1. ScottPress

    ScottPress The Horny Sovereign Prestige

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2013
    Messages:
    1,803
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    The Holy Moose Empire
    High Score:
    1,826
  2. Invictus

    Invictus Prisoner

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2013
    Messages:
    2,873
    Location:
    Cidade Maravilhosa
    I saw what they did to Cailan. Why would anyone play this offense to humanity?
     
  3. ScottPress

    ScottPress The Horny Sovereign Prestige

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2013
    Messages:
    1,803
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    The Holy Moose Empire
    High Score:
    1,826
    It's fun. Cailan has two versions that only differ in color. One of the more useless heroes in the game.
     
  4. Blinker

    Blinker DA Member DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2011
    Messages:
    168
    Location:
    Bristol, UK
    Unrelated to anything meaningful, and probably only for the native speakers (although I'd be curious to hear any input).

    How long ago is too long/short to refer to as "the other day"?

    I've been using it my whole life for events that occurred months or even years ago. I've only recently discovered I seem to be wildly out of step with my friends on this matter.

    So trivial that saying it doesn't need its only thread is insufficient, but still curious

    Edited to change "Hope long" to "How long"
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2017
  5. wordhammer

    wordhammer Chief Warlock DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2010
    Messages:
    1,598
    Location:
    In the wood room, somewhere flat
    It's an anecdotal placeholder, so you use it to be vague in the first place. Common usage would be to assume that 'the other day' isn't yesterday (or you would have said so) but probably not a few weeks ago, unless nothing else remarkable had happened in the interim. The older you are, the more leeway you get.
     
  6. Aekiel

    Aekiel Angle of Mispeling Prestige DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2006
    Messages:
    857
    Location:
    The Mouth of Ports
    High Score:
    9,373
    Never really considered it, and this is very subjective in the first place (also dependent on my memory, which is spotty at best), but I generally go:

    A couple of days ago - Some time in the past week
    The other day - Within the two-three week period preceding
    Not long back - Within the month
    A while back - Within six months
    Earlier on this year - Any time I can't pin a month to
    Way back - Any time I can't pin a year to
     
  7. Eilyfe

    Eilyfe Headmaster

    Joined:
    May 27, 2014
    Messages:
    1,042
    Two grammar question here:

    #1

    Take a sentence like the following: “I suggest meeting us at the Pub down the street.”

    I fully realize that it would be “meeting each other” when talking within a group. But I also believe the “us” is correct if a group is talking to someone not within their group, inviting them. For example, say two friends and I suddenly meet another friend who wasn’t originally included in our plans, and I’m now going to invite that “external” friend.

    The lecturer told me that no matter the specification, the “us” in that example is incorrect. Since I’m unsure I thought I’d ask some native speakers.

    You could of course say “I suggest you meet us at the pub,” but is the specific way I phrased it above wrong?

    #2

    The lecturer also says that "I haven't been here for many of years" is technically correct, but the "of" before years rubs me wrong.

    Thanks in advance for the clarification.
     
  8. Zombie

    Zombie John Waynes Teeth Prestige DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2007
    Messages:
    758
    Location:
    Within the Garden of Nurgle.
    High Score:
    2,094
    I can't speak for 1, but for the second one, it's technically correct, but it's not a modern saying. many years is sufficient, and is generally accepted.

    Huh, I supplemented a for of when I read it the first time. Still, its an older staying.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2017
  9. Thaumologist

    Thaumologist Chief Warlock

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2011
    Messages:
    1,451
    Location:
    Chester, England
    Number 1 seems fine as a native speaker, but I can't say whether it would be okay by actual rules.
    "We'll be at the pub. I suggest meeting us there" (as opposed to at my house, because then you'd have further to walk) makes sense.

    As for 2, it sounds wrong, and if I saw/heard someone use it, I'd assume they're ESL. Close enough to understand, but not correct. As Zombie says it is correct though, I guess I'd just be wrong on that.


    However, I really wouldn't sweat it. Go by what the lecturer says, because they'll be the one marking you, and I'm not sure you can source a Harry Potter fanforum as to them being wrong.
     
  10. Eilyfe

    Eilyfe Headmaster

    Joined:
    May 27, 2014
    Messages:
    1,042
    The questions result mostly out of personal interest. I'm not getting graded in her course.

    I kind of argued my case in the seminar regarding those two things though, and her strong refusal of "I suggest meeting us" made me curious. Hence the questions. I'm not going to correct her on any of those; I just wanted to know so I could file it away for myself.

    Thanks in any case!
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2017
  11. Darth_Revan

    Darth_Revan Secret Squirrel Prestige DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2006
    Messages:
    298
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    The Empire City
    High Score:
    2810
    Your lecturer is wrong on both counts. Your inclinations were correct.

    #1. "We should meet each other" would only be correct if you were in both in groups or both by yourselves.

    If you = group and them = 1, then "you should meet us".

    If you = 1 and them = group, then "you (plural) should meet me".

    #2. "Many of years" is just flat-out, unequivocally wrong.
     
  12. Oment

    Oment The Betrayer

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2011
    Messages:
    1,685
    Not a native, but I see absolutely zero problems with that first sentence as formulated. It is implied that the one(s) being told to meet at the pub is(are) not a part of the 'us' group. In fact, I'd go as far as to say that the only time that 'us' is wrong is when there is no plural object pronoun to be used - i.e. when you're telling someone to meet you (and just you) somewhere. (In which case you'd use the first person singular object pronoun as opposed to first person plural object pronoun, excepting pluralis majestatis.)

    Of course, you can avoid the entire shebang by changing the s into a p, if you're into avoidance.

    Many of years rings wrong to me. There's the slightly more poetical 'many a year' to contrast with 'many years', but I have never heard 'many of years'.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2017
  13. TheWiseTomato

    TheWiseTomato Tactical Tomato DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Messages:
    3,081
    Location:
    Australia.
    Sounds like the lecturer misheard 'many a year' once and has run with the 'of' ever since.
     
  14. Rah

    Rah Auror

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2011
    Messages:
    664
    Location:
    MA, USA
    As you might've heard the senate passed a tax bill with a bunch of random shit in it and there's very little doubt of Trump not signing it.

    I read somewhere that one of the changes has to do with grad school, does anyone know more on what this means for grad students?
     
  15. Solfege

    Solfege High Inquisitor DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2008
    Messages:
    582
    Location:
    East Coast & the South
    A plurality of grad students are charged tuition that is then waived (for whatever stupid administrative reason). The bill would treat that waived tuition, some $30-50k, as taxable income on top of the modest research stipend received for living expenses. So essentially 25% of grad students will see several thousand dollars more added to their tax burdens.

    Given that engineering PhDs, at the best of times, get some $30k worth of stipend and humanities/pure sciences PhDs substantially less, those this affects will find it fairly hard-hitting.
     
  16. Rah

    Rah Auror

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2011
    Messages:
    664
    Location:
    MA, USA
    Damn looks like I need to talk to my university, not sure if I should expect a tax hike. I have a work scholarship and I'm assuming this will have some affect on that.
     
  17. Perspicacity

    Perspicacity High Score: 3,994 Prestige DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2007
    Messages:
    599
    Location:
    Elsewhere
    High Score:
    3,994
    As I understand it, this language is in the House bill but not the Senate bill. One hopes that when it comes out of committee it won't have this bit of fuckery in it.

    My expectation is that if this does become law, universities will be forced to raise graduate stipends in order to offset the additional tax burden. This means higher overhead on grants, higher tuition for undergraduate students, cutbacks in numbers of TA positions, graduate fellowships, etc. In the end, we'll get less science and engineering return on investment and we'll probably see diminished incentives to enter graduate school, both of which are going to be a net negative for R&D in the country.
     
    Rah
  18. why?

    why? Third Year

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2017
    Messages:
    98
    High Score:
    0
    You're studying in Germany, right? Not sure, but for some reason, I thought you were when reading Magicks. Maybe it was on your profile. Anyway, if yes, then your teacher is probably adamant about this because they think you're translating literally, i.e, "wir treffen uns".

    Which is crazy, because it's obvious that you are not! "Wir treffen uns hier" would probably translate to "We're meeting here" or "We'll be meeting here", without the "us".

    It's such a simple sentence and it makes perfect sense. If you strip it down to "Meet us at the pub.", which is essentially the same meaning, there is no confusion to be had.

    ---

    So, I'm applying to university again. Hopefully this time I'll leave with a degree.

    All of them ask why I would want to study in a liberal arts college, based on my academic strengths and interests. This part, I reckon I can handle. The next one though, is why I would want to be in a residential program (they all require you to live on campus) with a bunch of international students (40-50%). I should support this with my ambitions and experiences.

    This part has me stumped.

    An alum told me that they're really big on diversity and everything international, suggested I talk about my time spent abroad and how the experience enriched me or something. I have no idea what I could say without sounding overly cheesy. Or like I'm making a big deal out of nothing.

    Does anyone have any tips/suggestions?
     
  19. Rehio

    Rehio Alchemist DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2007
    Messages:
    2,312
    Location:
    New Mexico
    My first thought is just to embrace the cheese and give them what they want. No one's gonna be judging you or holding this application up years later saying "Hey, you aren't embracing diverse culture like you said you would."
     
  20. Marsupial

    Marsupial Death Eater DLP Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2008
    Messages:
    961
    Question for the Germans on the board:
    I'm trying to decide whether or not to bother applying for a job; do you think an annual salary of 38,000 Euro (pre-tax) is enough for a single person to live in Berlin? Ideally without flatmates/house sharing, but either really. From what I can tell searching rental costs it looks oddly feasible. I have the equivalent of ~140 Euro/month in student loans, but nothing else which would suck money out of living costs.

    I'm used to pricing position announcements against living costs for London or Washington DC, and it's weirding me out a little that Berlin seems so much cheaper and more feasible. Is that actually true, or is the internet lying to me again?